Stories are told where we, the reader or listener decide on who we like. Tiffany Jackson-Jones is one of those stories.

By Matt Hallett

Every so often there is a story in sport which touches your heart. The story of Tiffany Jackson-Jones is one of those. Before we get into any other story, however, it is important to note that Jackson-Jones has re-signed with the Los Angeles Sparks.

Jackson-Jones was a role player last year, only averaging 5.7 minutes per game in the 26 she played. Her 1.1 points per game average is not much of a game changer. Jackson-Jones did almost have a double-double in the first game of the season with eight points and eight rebounds.

However, when you are backing up players the caliber of Nneka Ogwumike and Alana Beard, there will not be much game time available. This is especially so when Jantel Lavender is coming off the bench.

However, this signing worked for both Jackson-Jones and the Sparks. Jackson-Jones gets to play on a contending team. The Sparks get a low-cost veteran to come off the bench who can produce when required.

However, I mentioned above the Jackson-Jones story is one which moves me. For those who don't know Jackson Jones has had a difficult time staying on the court. She missed the 2012 season with the birth of her son.

In her final year with the Tulsa Shock, she had severe limits on her minutes due to stress fractures. Then in 2015, Jackson-Jones would be diagnosed with breast cancer. Having experienced someone close to me go through this condition, I understand how tough this can be to fight through.

Not only did Jackson-jones fight this battle, she won it. Anyone who has the capacity to battle this disease has the ability to fight back into the sport they love. The Sparks signed Jackson-Jones in 2016, the first team to do so in the WNBA after her battle with cancer.

In a sport where loyalty is a dying ideal, it seems the Sparks and Jackson-Jones are bucking this trend. While she may find it hard to break into the forward rotation, Jackson-Jones is a fighter and I put nothing past her.